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Ecclesiastical & Heritage World Current Issue

Ecclesiastical & Heritage World Lighting Dynamics UK

Ecclesiastical & Heritage World JTC Roofing Contractors Ltd

Ecclesiastical & Heritage World Nimrod

Ecclesiastical & Heritage World Elsec

Church Loop Systems

Audio Frequency Induction Loops - The Law has changed

In the UK public venues such as churches MUST have a standards compliant Audio Frequency Induction Loop fitted - by law.

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Back Issues

Ecclesiastical & Heritage World Back Issues

Historic Buildings

How clients can benefit from Institute’s standards

One of the most important resources for those looking for specialist advice in the field of historic building conservation is the Historic Environment Service Provider’s Recognition (HESPR) scheme, part of the trading arm of the Institute of Historic Building Conservation (IHBC).

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Master Carvers

Carving out an enviable reputation

The Master Carvers Association was founded in 1897 as an employers association, by a number of companies who employed carvers, to enable national negotiations with the emerging unions.

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Lightning Protection

Inspect and Protect with ATLAS

Lightning protection is widely used within the corporate sector but many churches and heritage buildings are unaware of the need for specialist lightning protection.

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Memorial Masons

A memorial should be a fitting tribute

Erecting a lasting memorial is the final service we can perform for a loved one when they have deceased and we put a great deal of care into choosing the right one.

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Heritage Training

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Skills for the future to safeguard the past

Ecclesiastical and Heritage World have a selection of heritage training providers listed within our online directory offering a wide range of courses.

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ISCE

Ecclesiastical & Heritage World Product Showcase

Promoting technical excellence

ISCE is a specialist Learned Society and professional body for sound and communications engineers. Founded in 1948, it is an entirely independent Institute, run by a Council elected by its members. Members maintain a code of conduct in professional activities, embodying high ethical standards and concern for the environmental and sociological impacts of professional activities.

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Ecclesiastical & Heritage World Mogo Direct

Darwen Terracotta and Faience

Ecclesiastical & Heritage World Fullers Finer Furniture

Ecclesiastical & Heritage World Argonaut Heating

Heritage East Anglia

England’s very own Far East has a rich and varied heritage

The fenland and broads of the East of England conceal within their mists a history that extends as far as Roman times. Here it was that Essex girl Boudica of the Iceni waged war against the Roman invaders and it was in the fenlands of Cambridgeshire and Norfolk that the Saxons of East Anglia fought the Danes.

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FTMRC

Ecclesiastical & Heritage World Product Showcase

Working in partnership is key to success

This was the key theme in the chairman's introduction to the recent FTMRC statement. Chairman, Trevor Corser, also managing director of JTC Roofing Contractors Ltd, said:

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Welsh Heritage

Choosing a contractor in Wales

There may be occasions when you need help to maintain your building. Cadw, the Welsh Government's historic environment service works for an accessible and well-protected historic environment for Wales, but is unable to recommend contractors - so here are a few simple tips to help you choose the right professional advisor, builder or craftsperson.

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Lead Contractors

Setting the standards for leadwork

Contractors wishing to join the LCA must submit three examples of their work to be assessed by a nominated LCA vetting officer, normally a member of Council. The design and application skills viewed on site will be graded and a subsequent recommendation made to the Chairman of the Vetting Committee, who will then report to Council.

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CRE Events

CRE - building on strong foundations

'I will build my church' is the main theme of this year's CRE International - Christian Resources Exhibition's mega-show in London. Whether a church is, indeed, mega or mini, members from all types come to CRE. As organisers the Bible Society point out, size is no issue as far as God is concerned - he wants the best for all of them.

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Stained Glass

A brief history of stained glass

The origins of the first stained glass windows are lost in history. The technique probably came from jewelry making, cloisonné and mosaics. Stained glass windows as we know them, seemed to arise when substantial church building began.

By the 10th century, depictions of Christ and biblical scenes were found in French and German churches and decorative designs found in England.

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Think Brick

Proven reliability over the centuries

Brick is one of our oldest building materials and its use dates back to the beginning of civilisation.

The Brick Development Association represents the United Kingdom and Ireland’s clay brick and paver industries and promotes the contribution that brick makes to the places and spaces we live and work in today.

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Antique Restoration

Nearly four decades of maintaining standards

For nearly four decades BAFRA has been ensuring that the heritage of antique furniture can be dealt with by the qualified, experienced and skilled craftsmen who have achieved accredited status within the organisation.

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Traditional Lime

Ancient building material still has many uses

One of the universal building materials prior to the end of the 19th century was lime. Lime was present in various forms in almost every building, from limewash on the walls of cattle byres and cottages to the mortar used on cathedral and castle walls.

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New Products Showcase

Ecclesiastical & Heritage World Product Showcase

New products help to conserve our heritage

Whilst visitors to this website operate in the sector committed to restoring and conserving the historic buildings and artefacts belonging to the past, they are non the less reliant on the very latest products on the market place to perform this task.

Showcased here you will find some of the latest and most innovative new products and services currently available to help us preserve and maintain our heritage for the enjoyment of generations to come.

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Master Craftsmen

The ‘resistance army’ that is fighting to preserve traditional craft skills

According to English Heritage, on average one historic building or monument has been destroyed every day since 1945. That fact has been accompanied by a fall in local authority heritage restoration budgets of 8% over the past eight years. These are worrying statistics, but perhaps the tide is turning as people are beginning to care more about our nation’s heritage.

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Government to fund security at places of worship

The British government have announced a £2.4 million fund to help secure places of worship in England and Wales. Churches, mosques and temples have been invited to bid for grants if they can show that they are at risk of attack from religious hate crimes.

Synagogues are excluded from the scheme because the government has provided a separate grant to the Community Security Trust, a charity that provides protection services to Britain’s Jewish communities.

The scheme has been launched by Britain's Home Secretary, Amber Rudd, as she outlined a Hate Crime Action Plan. This will include a study into how the different police forces in the country understand and respond to hate crimes and a commitment from the government to “give young people and teachers the tools they need to tackle hatred and prejudice, including through a new programme to equip teachers to facilitate conversations around international events and the impact they have on communities here in the UK.”

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How we helped create a modern-day masterpiece

In architecture and interior design, woodcarving rarely exists alone. Usually it’s integrated into the millwork, such as mouldings, columns, brackets and cabinetry. That means a woodcarving workshop must either be part of, or comfortable partnering with, joinery workshops and vice versa.

The working relationship between woodcarver and joiner has existed for centuries. My company, Agrell Architectural Carving, has decades of experience partnering with joinery companies using tried-and-true techniques passed down through generations of our trades. My job as account manager is to ensure our hand-carved ornamentation integrates perfectly into joinery projects.

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Rainclear bring you the ability to buy Cast Iron Roof Drainage Outlets online

You can now browse and buy Harmer Cast Iron Roof Outlets online on Rainclear Systems’ website. You can conveniently pay by card or Paypal with delivery to you or your site within 5 working days.

Harmer are well known for manufacturing the marketing leading range of rainwater handling and building drainage products. Now Rainclear offer the added convenience of buying them on a mobile responsive ecommerce website wherever you are and whenever you are ready.

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Priory church extension is Project of the Year

The award for Project of the Year in the 2015 East of England RICS Awards was won by the conservation and extension of the medieval church at Clare Priory in Suffolk. Established in 1248, Clare Priory is one of the oldest religious houses in England; situated in the shadows of Clare Castle on the banks of the River Stour.

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Blythburgh Church increases light levels and reduces annual running costs by 46%

Holy Trinity Church, Blythburgh, Suffolk, is known locally as 'The Cathedral of the Marshes' and it stands tall, visible for miles from the A12 trunk road. Like many other churches, Holy Trinity relies on carefully designed external lighting to make its flint decorated architecture a local landmark by night as well as by day. A warm colour rendering, minimal light pollution and restricted glare were inherent factors in the design brief of this relighting project, which covered every elevation of this wonderful building.

Following a successful re-lighting of St Peter & St Paul, Wangford, which is in the same group of parishes, the design and installation team of James Laws and Boggis Electrical of Wrentham was chosen by Blythburgh PCC to re-light Holy Trinity. They selected Pulsar Light Eco-Range floods for both projects.

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Lime mortars give protection to Kent and Caen stone

All Saints’ Church in Laxfield is a classic Suffolk wool church, with a long, wide nave and a superb west tower dating from the mid 15th century. The tower is 100ft high and originally built of Caen stone dressings with fine flushwork flint panels – as you’d expect to see in East Anglia – and much more unusually with large expanses of Kentish ragstone ashlar.

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New Canterbury handmade clay tiles the perfect match for sensitive re-roofing project in Surrey

A complex and sensitive re-roofing project in Surrey is amongst the first to use the Canterbury handmade clay tile range from Marley Eternit, which was re-introduced to the market to help architects and contractors achieve a genuine handmade finish when creating traditional clay roofs.

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Historic metalwork specialists repair the Maclagan Crozier

When the Crozier head on Lichfield Cathedral's Maclagan Crozier had broken away from the central stem, as a result of the screw thread being overtightened, the cathedral's treasurer appointed Shropshire-based Historic Metalwork Conservation Company (HMCC Ltd) to carry out the repair.

The company provide conservation advice to all those charged with the care, management and preservation of historic metalwork in all its various forms, but with a particular emphasis on historic ironwork.

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SnapIT Aluminium Rainwater Range with NEW stylish ‘Swept’ offsets and bends

Rainclear Systems, the UK’s largest stockist and online retailer of metal rainwater systems, is pleased to introduce an innovative improvement to its already popular, contemporary, SnapIT extruded aluminium rainwater system.

All those who have seen and used SnapIT before have found its contemporary styling, simple ‘bolt-less’ joining guttering and swaged downpipe system an impressive finishing touch to their project. Now the system has been engineered to incorporate an even more stylish finish.

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Ancient Order uses latest solution against rising damp

The Honourable Society of the Inner Temple, commonly known as Inner Temple, is one of the four professional associations (Inns of Court) for barristers and judges in London. The Temple takes its name from the Military Order of the Knights Templar.

The old Buttery and Crypt date from the 14th century and are the oldest rooms still in use in the Temple. The Buttery, a Grade II* listed building, is also one of the very few 14th century secular stone buildings in Greater London. With an average wall thickness of 2400 mm, the dehydration of these walls was not possible with traditional methods.

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Rosehill Furniture Group complete Three Peaks Challenge for charity

On June 10th, Cheshire based contract furniture specialists, Rosehill Furniture Group, set off to complete the Three Peaks Challenge. Eight courageous Rosehill team members took park in the challenge in aid of The Christie, and Action on Womb Cancer. The ultimate goal was to raise £3,000.

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What is CompetentRoofer?

CompetentRoofer is the Government-licenced Competent Person Scheme that allows professional roofing contractors to self-certify that their roof refurbishment work complies with Building Regulations within England and Wales. The scheme encompasses all roofing types for domestic, industrial and commercial properties.

Cheap work has hidden cost implications

Your property is one of the most expensive and important things that you can own so risking any building work to unregistered contractors, simply because it is the cheaper option, is false economy.

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Carving out an international reputation, including Stockport

The art of woodcarving is truly international and nowhere is that better illustrated than in the career of Devon-based Laurent Robert. Born in the Auvergne region of France, Laurent began his career as an apprentice there before moving to England to continue his apprenticeship with the long-established ecclesiastical firm of church restorers, Herbert Read Ltd. While he was with them he was involved in the restoration of the organ case of St Paul’s in Deptford and the refurbishment of Kensington Palace Chapel.

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Aldeburgh Church gets a new roof

The Church of Our Lady and St Peter in Aldeburgh, Suffolk sits on a hill top with stunning views of the coast below. When it was built, the church was intended to be very much in the style of the 40-odd round towered medieval churches that you find in the county, particularly along the coast.

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NFRC appoints Head of Technical Services

Kevin Taylor, a well-known figure to NFRC members as the technical officer for Slating and Tiling, has recently been promoted to head up all NFRC's technical services including flat roofing, sheeting and cladding and health and safety. Kevin has vast experience throughout the industry and a respected authority within organisations such as BSI and NHBC. He has served NFRC for over ten years and prior to this, had a long career in the industry from apprentice through to contracts manager, college lecturer and independent consultant.

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Roof repairs correct century-old ‘mistakes’

The Cathedral of St John the Baptist on the outskirts of Norwich city centre is one of the best examples of the Victorian Gothic revival in the country. St John’s is the mother church of Roman Catholics in Norfolk, Suffolk, Cambridgeshire and Peterborough. It is the focus of many large diocesan occasions and, of course, the seat of the Bishops of East Anglia. Indeed, that is the origin of the word ‘cathedral’, which derives from the Latin cathedra, meaning chair or throne.

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To access all areas, take the aerial route

East Anglia is home to some of the most precious ancient churches in England – a good number of which date from the Saxon period. It is no surprise, therefore, that some of the most innovative methods for ensuring their continued good condition are to be found there.

One deployment of modern technology is the use of unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs), or drones, to overfly sites in need of examination.

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Natural History Museum protected by Advanced Systems

The world-famous Natural History Museum in London,and its more than five million annual visitorsare being protected by intelligent fire panels from Advanced.

Often called the ‘Cathedral of Nature’ the Natural History Museum is renowned for its collections of dinosaurs and ornate architecture, andis widely recognised as the pre-eminent centre for natural history and related research. The Museum is the third most popular in the United Kingdom and its irreplaceable 80 million strong collection is of global importance and includes many collected by Charles Darwin.

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Missing waterwheel replaced at Dunster Watermill

Situated on the River Avill the present Dunster Watermill was built around 1780. Milling however has taken place on this site for over 900 years and is mentioned in the Domesday Book. The mill is powered by two overshot wheels and is still producing organic flour today. It is currently owned by the National Trust.

Dorothea Restorations started the replacement of the missing waterwheel at Dunster during the winter of 2014/2015. The English Oak staff was selected by hand and machined down to replicate the faceted profile allowing the wedging of the nave at either end.

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Historic England helps Boston build on its past

By raising awareness of Boston's historic significance and encouraging investment in a series of conservation projects, Historic England has helped this Lincolnshire town to capitalise on its past.

Boston reached its zenith in the medieval period when it was the second busiest port in Britain, but decreasing wool exports led to its decline. Although enjoying a revival in the 18th and 19th centuries, by the 20th century the silting of the Haven and a shift in trade routes transformed Boston from international trading hub to remote coastal town.

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Norfolk Conservation aims to turn the tide at seaside town

Popular perceptions of Great Yarmouth are that of a one dimensional, kitsch and deprived seaside holiday resort. Images of low-value amusement parks, gaudy slot arcades, and penurious society are likely to surface. True, Great Yarmouth suffers from economic deprivation and hardship. One can see it in the buildings, street and faces. However, it is also fair to presume that this perception too is deprived and one-dimensional.

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